Privacy Papers, Part 22 – 2.000123 Interlude Quote-Fest

The PrivacyPapers was released over a two week period of emails by Michael Kasdan, who has generously given us permission to post it in its entirety over several posts.

You can search Twitter: #PrivacyPapers, for the content and to share comments.

22. Privacy Papers – 2.000123 Interlude Quote-Fest

From: privacy-papers@googlegroups.com [mailto:privacy-papers@googlegroups.com] On Behalf Of Michael Kasdan
Sent: Thursday, August 29, 2013
To: privacy-papers@googlegroups.com
Subject: PrivacyPapers – 2.000123 Interlude Quotefest

As many of you know, I’m a real sucker for quotes.  Here are a few thought provoking ones on Privacy:

“Privacy and security are those things you give up when you show the world what makes you extraordinary. – Margaret Cho

“Civilization is the progress toward a society of privacy. The savage’s whole existence is public, ruled by the laws of his tribe. Civilization is the process of setting man free from men.” – Ayn Rand

“I have as much privacy as a goldfish in a bowl.” – Princess Margaret

“You use your money to buy privacy because during most of your life you aren’t allowed to be normal.” – Johnny Depp (AKA, Hottie McHotterson, I’m told)

“This has been a learning experience for me. I also thought that privacy was something we were granted in the Constitution. I have learned from this when in fact the word privacy does not appear in the Constitution.” – Bill Masher

“Relying on the government to protect your privacy is like asking a peeping tom to install your window blinds.” – John Perry Barlow

“You already have zero privacy – get over it.” – Scott McNeal

“All violations of essential privacy are brutalizing.” Katharine Fullerton Gerould

“As a social good, I think privacy is greatly overrated because privacy basically means concealment. People conceal things in order to fool other people about them. They want to appear healthier than they are, smarter, more honest and so forth.” – Richard Posner

“Every American deserves to live in freedom, to have his or her privacy respected and a chance to go as far as their ability and effort will take them – regardless of race, gender, ethnicity or economic circumstances.” – Christopher Dodd

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