The Raiders Are Likely Moving to Las Vegas, but Who’s Paying for It?

After several years of speculation, it appears that the NFL is finally ready to gamble on the Las Vegas market. In January 2017, the Oakland Raiders filed relocation papers with the NFL to move to Las Vegas—the first step in the relocation process for an NFL franchise. The next step is for 24 of the 32 NFL owners to approve the move at the NFL owners’ meetings held from March 26 to 29… Read More

Sports Blackout Rules in the Age of Cord-Cutting

Watching sports on television used to be a simple proposition. You had a basic cable package that let you to watch your local team on its television partner’s channel and certain national broadcasts. If you lived outside of your favorite team’s market or did not have cable, you were out of luck. However, the increase in internet streaming options and quality has put the traditional cable model under pressure. A recent study shows.. Read More

Capitol Records, LLC v. ReDigi Inc. and the Future of Digital Resale

In 2013, the Southern District of New York decided a case, Capitol Records, LLC v. ReDigi Inc., that effectively eliminated a consumer’s ability to resell lawfully owned digital goods. Now the Second Circuit will hear the appeal, and anyone interested in a coherent future for copyright law, or an effective right to sell their goods, would do well to pay attention. ReDigi’s software provided users with an online market for buying and selling.. Read More

Disparaging Trademarks and Free Speech – Will the Supreme Court Strike Down the Disparagement Clause?

15 U.S.C. 1052(a) and its validity was examined in Lee v. Tam. The question is, will the Supreme Court strike it down? The statute in question is the “disparagement provision” of the 1946 Lanham Trademark Act, which prohibits the registration of any mark that “may disparage persons, institutions, beliefs, or national symbols, or bring them into contempt, or disrepute.” Registration of a trademark provides nationwide protection against others from using the name. In 2011,.. Read More

Artists Urging Reforms of the DMCA Safe Harbor: ‘Our Culture Is At Stake’

Last month, T Bone Burnett, a legendary musician, songwriter, and record producer, submitted a five-minute video to the U.S. Copyright Office calling for reforms in the Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA) takedown-and-notice process on behalf of the Content Creators Coalition (C3) members and all music creators. In the video posted on February 21, Burnett illustrates how the current business models “designed to scrape away value rather than fuel new creation, focused on taking.. Read More

Stephanie Lenz, the Dancing Baby, and the Changing Landscape of Fair Use on YouTube

Last month marked the 10-year anniversary of the day that Stephanie Lenz uploaded a twenty-nine second clip of her one-year-old dancing to YouTube. The seemingly innocent video picked up very little steam across the web—the video was similar to any other home video, perhaps with an added dose of humor. This video would soon, however, become an international phenomenon because of a music clip playing in the background. In 2007, Universal Music Group.. Read More

Trademark Litigation in the Shadow of B&B Hardware

In 2015, the Supreme Court decided a trademark dispute, B&B Hardware, Inc. v. Hargis, Indus. However, in the light of more public trademark cases, such as the Washington Redskins trademark cancelation, the decision has not received much press. In many respects, this is not terribly surprising. B&B Hardware decided a very narrow issue of trademark litigation procedure. However, the consequences will be dramatic for litigants going forward. B&B Hardware was an incredibly drawn-out.. Read More

Still Better to be an Inventor than an Author – Comparing Copyright and Patent for Software Algorithms

With the 2014 decision in Alice, SCOTUS reiterated the two-step Mayo framework applied to method and software patents. A patent application is deemed unpatentable under 35 U.S.C. §101 if (1) the claims are directed to one of the three judicial exceptions (laws of nature, abstract idea, and natural phenomenon); (2) even if a claim falls under a judicial exception, that claim is still deemed patentable if there is an “inventive concept” that transforms.. Read More

Courts Split Over Fourth Circuit’s New False Advertising Standard

This blog post discusses the impact of the Fourth Circuit’s ruling regarding “literally false” advertising claims. The case is In re GNC Corp., 789 F.3d 505 (2015). An earlier blog post describing the facts of the case, as well as the merits of the Fourth Circuit’s decision, can be found here.   Consider the following scenario. Your company has been manufacturing a line of supplements for over a decade, and the bottle lists.. Read More

Welcoming the Marrakesh Treaty into a Consequentialist Framework

  Curing the Book Famine The Marrakesh Treaty to Facilitate Access to Published Works by Visually Impaired Persons and Persons with Print Disabilities is widely lauded as a miracle. The Treaty aims to cure the global “book famine” that millions of the blind and visually impaired have suffered from due to a lack of access to published knowledge. It is the first copyright treaty to expressly proclaim a foundation based on human rights.. Read More