How the Sausage Gets Made: The 2011 NFL Collective Bargaining Agreement

This past year was a dramatic one for the NFL, and not solely because of the spectacular on-field play. On August 11, 2017, Dallas Cowboy’s running back Ezekiel Elliott, the NFL’s leading rusher in 2016, was suspended for the first six games of the 2017 season for violating the personal conduct policy. Five days later, Ezekiel Elliot, through the NFL Players Association (NFLPA), appealed the suspension. The NFLPA’s lawsuit did not try to.. Read More

Music Modernization Act: A Bill to Help Songwriters Pay Their Bills?

In the past twenty years, the state of the music industry has changed dramatically. Between 1998 and 2014, the industry was in crisis. Total revenue from U.S. music sales and licensing dropped from $15 billion to $7 billion. CD sales were on the decline, pirating was on the rise, and even when consumers purchased their music legally, they tended towards buying .99 cent singles rather than full albums. Since 2014, streaming has taken.. Read More

Spotify’s IPO!

Spotify (SPOT), the music streaming service, is expected to begin trading on April 3. This IPO is one to watch by all fans of music, technology, and finance.   What is Spotify?   Spotify is a music, podcast and video streaming service from Stockholm, Sweden. It came to the United States in 2010 and has been booming ever since.  Spotify has about 159 million monthly active users and 71 million subscribers for its.. Read More

Sandoz Inc. v. Amgen Inc. and Its Implications

Background of the Case:   Sandoz Inc v. Amgen Inc., 137 S. Ct. 1664 (2017) is a case that involved statutory construction of the Biologics Price Competition and Innovation Act of 2009 (“BPCIA” or “Biosimilars Act”), which is codified in 42 U.S.C. § 262. The BPCIA is quite similar to the Drug Price Competition and Patent Term Restoration Act of 1984, also known as the Hatch-Waxman Amendments which created procedures to facilitate more.. Read More

Review: New York Right of Publicity Law: Reimagining Privacy and the First Amendment in the Digital Age

New York has largely been operating under the same right of privacy statute since 1903. Over a century later, the New York State legislature has decided that it is time to make a big change.   A new bill, Assembly Bill A08155, is currently being drafted and considered by the New York legislature. The bill was the center of conversation at an event hosted by the Cardozo Arts and Entertainment Law Journal on.. Read More

The Bayh-Dole Act Has Been Successful in Stimulating a Market for Federally Funded Inventions, Now It’s Time to Bring Those Inventions to the Public

The federal government has proved to be ineffective at bringing publically funded discoveries to the public The Bayh-Dole Act of the 1980’s was intended to maximize the public’s return on federally funded research by getting inventions into the hands of companies to bring them to the market (for a general introduction). The goal was to maximize the public’s return on our investments by placing IP rights in the hands of Research institutions, who.. Read More

Sports Gambling: The Anti-Commandeering Argument Against PASPA

Background Information   In 1992, Congress passed PASPA amid concerns that the legalization of sports gambling at the State level would spread. This legislation prohibited most States from licensing sports gambling. Professional and Amateur Sports Protection Act, 28 U.S.C. §§ 3704 (1993). In 2012, the New Jersey State legislature enacted New Jersey’s Sports Wagering Law, permitting State authorities to license “sports gambling in casinos and racetracks and casinos to operate ‘sports pools.’” NCAA.. Read More

Murphy v. NCAA: The Case that Could Transform Sports Betting Across the Nation

The fight for widespread legalization of sports betting in this country received a huge boost this past June when the Supreme Court, to the surprise of many and over the objection of the Solicitor General, agreed to hear New Jersey’s lawsuit. Murphy v. NCAA, formerly Christie v. NCAA, is set to be decided in the near future. The judges’ decision to hear the case, and the sentiments of many of the judges during.. Read More

An Unstoppable Force Meets an Immovable Object: A Glimpse at the Emerging Effects of the DMCA’s Anti-Circumvention Provision on the Internet of Things

Next year will mark the twentieth anniversary of the passage of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act (“DMCA”), Congress’s controversial response to novel copyright protection issues posed by digital media and new technologies that facilitate piracy and other infringing activity.  Signed into law by President Clinton a mere seven months before the release of the infamous pioneering peer-to-peer file sharing platform, Napster, the DMCA presciently provided copyright owners and prosecutors with a powerful new.. Read More

Matal v. Tam and Disparaging Trademarks

Simon Tam,  “I’d be happy to send [Redskins or Daniel Snyder] some legal bills.”   Simon Tam, the front man of a Portland based dance-rock band named “The Slants”, filed suit against the Patent and Trademark Office (PTO) when the PTO refused to trademark their band’s name. Their trademark was rejected under section 2(a) of the Lanham Act, the disparagement clause. The disparagement clause provides that the PTO may prohibit the registration of.. Read More