Teenagers throughout the world would tell you that sports video games have vastly improved over the last 20 years. Game controls have become more sophisticated, player movements have been refined, and depictions of sports venues have become infinitely more detailed. Yet, the most striking difference between the games of today and those of the mid-to-late 90’s are the depictions of the actual bodies of the players. The generic figures of early video games.. Read More

Pay-Per-View Theft: Increasing Ambiguity

A few months ago, the ABA Journal published an article addressing lawyers’ recent aggressive involvement in minimizing pay-per-view theft. Pay-per-view theft can be categorized into roughly three subheadings: active theft, pay theft, and passive theft. Active theft occurs when someone intentionally makes an illegal physical connection to the cable system for the purpose of receiving cable service in their business. Pay theft occurs when someone intentionally attaches equipment (e.g., black boxes, decoders, etc.).. Read More

The End of the Amateur Era

One of the most controversial question in the modern sports era is, what is an amateur? It seems silly and almost intuitive, but as one delves into the depths of this question, the waters quickly become murky. A quick search of the term yields denotative definitions that we connotatively think of: “a person who engages in a study, sport, or other activity for pleasure rather than for financial benefit or professional reasons,” or,.. Read More

Interview with Richard Samson: Vice President and Assistant General Counsel for the New York Times

Richard Samson is the Vice President and Assistant General Counsel the New York Times, and recently spoke as a panelist at the JIPEL Careers in IP Symposium. Parts of the conversation have been condensed and edited for clarity.  Q: How did you end up practicing intellectual property law? A: I had a really strong interest in entertainment and media before I even went to law school. I thought, without really knowing too much.. Read More

The Raiders Are Likely Moving to Las Vegas, but Who’s Paying for It?

After several years of speculation, it appears that the NFL is finally ready to gamble on the Las Vegas market. In January 2017, the Oakland Raiders filed relocation papers with the NFL to move to Las Vegas—the first step in the relocation process for an NFL franchise. The next step is for 24 of the 32 NFL owners to approve the move at the NFL owners’ meetings held from March 26 to 29… Read More

From the Mailroom to the Courtroom: Glatt v. Fox Searchlight Pictures and its Effects on Entertainment Industry Internships

Unquestionably, the entertainment industry has engendered an almost-mythical culture surrounding unpaid internships. Though highly romanticized, the journey from unpaid intern to Hollywood executive is well-known and has spawned some of Hollywood’s most famous players. Michael Ovitz, David Geffen, Rich Ross, and countless others – the list of Hollywood moguls who began their careers as unpaid interns in the infamous “mailroom” is strikingly impressive. Perhaps these were the career paths envisioned by plaintiffs Eric.. Read More

California’s Strange New Age Law

Have you ever been watching a television show or movie with characters supposedly of high-school age—think Gossip Girl, Mean Girls, Greece—and then been shocked to discover that the actors portraying these characters were significantly older than their on-screen portrayals? Finding out an actor’s age has become as simple as a brief search on a smartphone, most easily on the Internet Movie Database (“IMDb”). For reference, Leighton Meester was 21 when she started playing.. Read More

Why It’s Time to End the Federal Prohibition on Sports Gambling

An estimated $90 billion will be bet on NFL and NCAA football games during the 2016-2017 season—yet only $2 billion will be done so legally. This discrepancy is a testament to the failure of the Professional and Amateur Sports Protection Act of 1992 (PASPA), a federal statute that outlawed sports gambling in the United States. Four states—Nevada, Oregon, Delaware, and Montana—were able to avoid this prohibition due to exemptions in PASPA that allowed.. Read More

The Growth of League of Legends, And the Need for Collective Bargaining

eSports has become more prominent over the past decade. In 2015, the global revenues for all eSports games combined reached $325 million, with North America accounting for a third of that total. The trend shows that such revenue will reach $1 billion by 2019. In terms of viewership, statistics show a global audience of 226 million viewers in 2015, trending towards 450 million viewers by 2019. In mainstream media, eSports has also grown.. Read More

Finding the Balance Between the Media Protection and the People’s Privacy

Invasion of privacy in United States is divided into three big categories; (1) Publicly disclosing private facts; (2) Depicting a person in a false light; and (3) commercial exploitation of a person’s name or likeness. It is not too difficult to see that the law in United States highly favors the media through its implementation of several protections. The first category is “public disclosure of private facts.” This involuntary loss of privacy tort.. Read More