Pay-Per-View Theft: Increasing Ambiguity

A few months ago, the ABA Journal published an article addressing lawyers’ recent aggressive involvement in minimizing pay-per-view theft. Pay-per-view theft can be categorized into roughly three subheadings: active theft, pay theft, and passive theft. Active theft occurs when someone intentionally makes an illegal physical connection to the cable system for the purpose of receiving cable service in their business. Pay theft occurs when someone intentionally attaches equipment (e.g., black boxes, decoders, etc.).. Read More

The CRISPR Patents and Their Hindrance to Innovation

One of the major battles going on in patent law is that concerning the CRISPR gene-editing technology. Basically, this technology allows for the modification of genes in living organisms. As one can imagine, if this technology could be perfected for use in human DNA, the scientific and business possibilities are vast and valuable. Involving this technology is a patent battle between the University of California Berkeley and the Broad Institute, which includes Harvard.. Read More

Lying In Wait: Patent Prosecution After the Elimination of Laches

In their March 21 decision on SCA Hygiene Products AB v. First Quality Baby Products LLC, the Supreme Court eliminated the laches defense in patent prosecution cases, potentially making it easier for patent-holders to “lie in wait” in order to obtain greater damages. The decision perhaps flew under the radar in the wake of the Varsity Brands decision, but could have a wide-ranging financial impact on patent-holders in the future. In patent infringement.. Read More